Key Features

  • Sample Size: 800 Canadians with type I or II diabetes; national distribution.
  • Final Deliverable: PowerPoint presentation with executive summary of key findings.
  • Field Dates: September/October 2014.
  • Report Delivery: November 2014.

With its ever increasing prevalence, diabetes is now part of the daily life of many Canadians. Diabetes affects many different aspects of the life of those who have it, and, on the whole, may have a significant impact on quality of life (QoL).

This study seeks to understand how people today are managing their diabetes inclusive of lifestyle modifications, medications taken, usage of technology, as well as access to healthcare, available treatment options and related social benefits. A key objective of this study is to better understand the impact of the decisions we make as a society will have on the quality of life of Canadians with diabetes.

A new element in the 2014 edition of this study includes an assessment of patients’ usage of Apps (e.g. diet & exercise, BG monitoring, compliance, and other diabetes Apps) in diabetes management to identify the top Apps, frequency of use, and potential gaps. The study further seeks to identify the Apps most commonly used by type of patient, therapy, blood glucose monitor, and any relationships that may exists between App usage resulting impact/influence on the patients’ disease management strategy. An assessment of social media usage will also be included in the technology section of this study.

The results of this study can be used by healthcare organizations and pharmaceutical companies to develop specific strategies to support healthcare professionals in helping diabetes patients better manage their condition, as well as to inform patient directed marketing, educational and support programs.

Key Objectives

  • Determine patients' awareness and usage of available and soon to be available treatments and BG monitors, as well as satisfaction with current treatment/BG monitor and switching intentions.
  • Assess the QOL among Canadians with diabetes.
  • Understand patients' current BG monitoring behaviours and preferences, including type of BG meter, frequency of usage, sources of influence and training.
  • Understand the impact of treatment options, diet and lifestyle choices, and access to care on QOL.
  • Determine the primary sources of information used by patients to learn about new treatments, BG monitors and Apps for diabetes management.
  • Assess impact of Provincial formulary differences and healthcare policies on QOL.
  • Explore patient perspectives towards non-insulin injectables, including benefits and concerns associated with them; willingness to try among non-users, and current experience among users, training, support; and unmet needs.
  • Explore medication/BG monitoring compliance and impact on QOL.
  • Assess patients' usage of mobile Apps (e.g. diet & exercise, BG monitoring, compliance, and other diabetes Apps) to identify the top Apps, frequency of use, and potential gaps.
  • Explore patients’ usage of social media.
  • Identify the mobile Apps most commonly used by type of patient, therapy, blood glucose monitor, and any relationships that may exists between App usage resulting impact/influence on the patients’ disease management strategy.